color intensity vs. opacity: rite or rong??

once and for all, id like to have the definitive answer on this… the way i understand it, all basic pigments except for white are translucent (tints) and you control their intensity by proportion. therefore, if you want an opaque glass job, white must be added to the mix. if premixed opaque pigments do exist, they are opaque because white has been mixed in already. are these assumptions right or wrong?

once and for all, id like to have the definitive answer on this… the > way i understand it, all basic pigments except for white are translucent > (tints) and you control their intensity by proportion. therefore, if you > want an opaque glass job, white must be added to the mix. if premixed > opaque pigments do exist, they are opaque because white has been mixed in > already. are these assumptions right or wrong? …You are abosolutely correct! …Pigment is actually the white base in paints,and inks.The tint is the color added to the pigment. The pigment makes the color opague/non-translucent.Tint in it self is translucent.Herb

So following that logic, ow would I be able to know which pigments have been "pre-mixed (with white) " and ones that are “pure” color?

So following that logic, ow would I be able to know which pigments have > been "pre-mixed (with white) " and ones that are > “pure” color? …tints are just that,color only.Herb

thnak herb

i don’t want to beat this to death, but I want to make sure when i discuss this, that i’m not being unintentionally ambiguous. all coloring agents should be referred to as tints, unless it is white or has white in it. these you should refer to as ‘pigments’ or even ‘opaque pigments’ ok?? i’m not usually this dense, ok! thanks again, ramon>>> …You are abosolutely correct!>>> …Pigment is actually the white base in paints,and inks.The tint > is the color added to the pigment. The pigment makes the color > opague/non-translucent.Tint in it self is translucent.Herb