Freezing temp. of resin?

Hello again from northern michigan. Awhile back I had some questions concerning my new shaping room in the upper peninsula of michigan, and wanted to thank again those that responded. Another question; anyone happen to know the freezing temp. of resins, acetone, and other materials related to making boards? I’m just wondering whether I am going to have to make a small area within my room to heat for my materials, well insulated and relatively small so it might just require a lightbulb? I plan to have my heat source on a thermostat which I will use when I am working, otherwise there will be no heat for periods and I am concerned about what can get cold and what cannot. That’s it for now. It is starting to cool down up here and the winds are blowing good. We have had many days of surf, averaging about 5 days a week for the past month or so. Soon it will be more. Granted, it is windswell but most people are very surprised at the quality. Take a peek at lakesurf.com. The opening three pic sequence is me on southern lake michigan. Thanks for any help and ‘pray for wind’- ryan g

Hello again from northern michigan. Awhile back I had some questions > concerning my new shaping room in the upper peninsula of michigan, and > wanted to thank again those that responded. Another question; anyone > happen to know the freezing temp. of resins, acetone, and other materials > related to making boards? I’m just wondering whether I am going to have to > make a small area within my room to heat for my materials, well insulated > and relatively small so it might just require a lightbulb? I plan to have > my heat source on a thermostat which I will use when I am working, > otherwise there will be no heat for periods and I am concerned about what > can get cold and what cannot. That’s it for now. It is starting to cool > down up here and the winds are blowing good. We have had many days of > surf, averaging about 5 days a week for the past month or so. Soon it will > be more. Granted, it is windswell but most people are very surprised at > the quality. Take a peek at lakesurf.com. The opening three pic sequence > is me on southern lake michigan. Thanks for any help and ‘pray for wind’- > ryan g Hey, Ryan, In your situation, the ends justify the means: no matter how you do it, just think “room temperature” for your surfboard building chemicals. Your life as a cold weather board builder will be so much easier.

I just bummed an old refrigerator off of someone and put a light bulb in it in the winter. It keeps the resin warm and runny for winter time glassing, although once you get the resin spread out on the board it cools quickly and gets like molasses. UV catalyst is the only way to go in cold weather. I also took the pump out of the refrigerator to use as a vaccum pump. Good Luck, Matthew Weaver>>> Hello again from northern michigan. Awhile back I had some questions > concerning my new shaping room in the upper peninsula of michigan, and > wanted to thank again those that responded. Another question; anyone > happen to know the freezing temp. of resins, acetone, and other materials > related to making boards? I’m just wondering whether I am going to have to > make a small area within my room to heat for my materials, well insulated > and relatively small so it might just require a lightbulb? I plan to have > my heat source on a thermostat which I will use when I am working, > otherwise there will be no heat for periods and I am concerned about what > can get cold and what cannot. That’s it for now. It is starting to cool > down up here and the winds are blowing good. We have had many days of > surf, averaging about 5 days a week for the past month or so. Soon it will > be more. Granted, it is windswell but most people are very surprised at > the quality. Take a peek at lakesurf.com. The opening three pic sequence > is me on southern lake michigan. Thanks for any help and ‘pray for wind’- > ryan g

I just bummed an old refrigerator off of someone and put a light bulb in > it in the winter. It keeps the resin warm and runny for winter time > glassing, although once you get the resin spread out on the board it cools > quickly and gets like molasses. UV catalyst is the only way to go in cold > weather.>>> I also took the pump out of the refrigerator to use as a vaccum pump.>>> Good Luck,>>> Matthew Weaver Yeah Dale, I realize that the room temp. is of utmost importance. I believe with a thermostat on my heater, and a thermomoter in the room I should be safe. I obviously will not do any resin work unless the temp. is right and consistent. I plan to warm the room up a couple hours beforehand to achieve this consistency. Thanks for the tip Matthew, I hadn’t thought of that. The fridge is well insulated and with a strong light bulb would probably keep the resins at a reasonable temp. I have worked with UV and have been successful using it. All I did though (in California) was walk the board outside into the sun, which worked well when done cautiously. I don’t think that will work up here though when there is 3’ of snow on the ground? Would the cold air affect it you think? I’ve heard UV bulbs are expensive and many are needed to do the job in a reasonable time, but I would glady invest a little if I knew it would work well. Any ideas? I still have some time to work out my ideas before it really gets cold in a couple months, thanks again guy’s. I still have some time to work out my ideas before it really gets cold in a couple months, thanks again guy’s.

Yeah Dale, I realize that the room temp. is of utmost importance. I > believe with a thermostat on my heater, and a thermomoter in the room I > should be safe. I obviously will not do any resin work unless the temp. is > right and consistent. I plan to warm the room up a couple hours beforehand > to achieve this consistency.>>> Thanks for the tip Matthew, I hadn’t thought of that. The fridge is well > insulated and with a strong light bulb would probably keep the resins at a > reasonable temp. I have worked with UV and have been successful using it. > All I did though (in California) was walk the board outside into the sun, > which worked well when done cautiously. I don’t think that will work up > here though when there is 3’ of snow on the ground? Would the cold air > affect it you think? I’ve heard UV bulbs are expensive and many are needed > to do the job in a reasonable time, but I would glady invest a little if I > knew it would work well. Any ideas?>>> I still have some time to work out my ideas before it really gets cold in > a couple months, thanks again guy’s.>>> I still have some time to work out my ideas before it really gets cold in > a couple months, thanks again guy’s. Actually if there is sun it should work regardless of the temp. and if it is sunny with three feet of snow on the ground you’ll have the added benefit of the reflection off of the snow to set up the lap without having to lean the board in all sorts of weird contortions, while worrying about dropping it or putting fingerprints in the lam. To build a UV unit like suncure recommends you are looking at dropping in the about $500 bucks depending on how exactly you do it and what you use although you could probably build a 4 light unit and do a side at a time for about 200 bucks. The nice part about a uv light unit is that you don’t have to navigate a series of doors with a wet lam and then worry about what might be floating in the air outside ready to adhere itself to your fresh lam. Matthew

Actually if there is sun it should work regardless of the temp. and if it > is sunny with three feet of snow on the ground you’ll have the added > benefit of the reflection off of the snow to set up the lap without having > to lean the board in all sorts of weird contortions, while worrying about > dropping it or putting fingerprints in the lam.>>> To build a UV unit like suncure recommends you are looking at dropping in > the about $500 bucks depending on how exactly you do it and what you use > although you could probably build a 4 light unit and do a side at a time > for about 200 bucks.>>> The nice part about a uv light unit is that you don’t have to navigate a > series of doors with a wet lam and then worry about what might be floating > in the air outside ready to adhere itself to your fresh lam.>>> Matthew I thought about the reflective qualities of the snow, it would probably actually work. I am a little unsure about the temp. though, and my door is standard size which would make it hard to get the board through by myself. I may look into making a box, thanks for your help. Also, you have any idea what the dimensions are on the green deck, orange bottom egg joel is surfing in the film ‘Quiver’? I want to shape an egg in the 6’8 range and am looking into dimennsions. Thanks again bro- ryan g

I’ve already brought this up. If you want to get a cheap UV curing setup, you could use regular Mercury Vapor lights over your glassing rack. Lots of towns are removing Mercury Vapor street lights and throwing them away. You could even look for wrecks where street lights are laying on the ground. …You don’t need an undamaged outer structure. Two 175 watt Mercury Vapor guard lights would cure the resin. But one or two (depending on wattage) MV Street Lights would work better. Guard lights emit a round pattern. Most street lights emit an elongated pattern for a street. The elongated pattern displaces light from unused areas onto an elongated elipse. This pattern would shine more UV light on your surfboard. One 400 watt street light would probably do the job. For MV lamps, use the clear, non filtered bulbs. Coatings on filter corrected bulbs convert UV light to visible light, a bad thing for resin cures.