"gloss coat resin" ?

I used “gloss coat resin” purchased from fiberglasssupply.com (or something like that) for some ding repairs and it set up with a light pinkish hue. IEven though the ding repairs were much thicker than a gloos coat I can’t imagine taking that chance on my next board. Anyone experienced this?

Gloss resin has a pinkish color which isn’t a problem when used as a thin gloss coat. The problem is when it’s thicker, like you experienced. For ding repairs use hotcoat resin. It sets up clear, and you can get a decent polish on it, or you can use gloss resin over the repair. Doug

Gloss resin has a pinkish color which isn’t a problem when used as a thin gloss coat. The problem is when it’s thicker, like you experienced. For ding repairs use hotcoat resin. It sets up clear, and you can get a decent polish on it, or you can use gloss resin over the repair. Doug

Thanks Doug. Then other than the color, what are the different properties between hot-coat resin and gloss?

Thanks Doug. Then other than the color, what are the different properties between hot-coat resin and gloss?

Mitchell, Chemically,I’m not sure, but as far as performance: Hotcoat (or Sanding Resin) is a good all-around resin. You can mix in resin filler to make a paste for filling holes (doesn’t run out all over the place), and because it sets up clear you don’t have to worry about color. It sands great. Gloss resin is intended to set up slower so it settles down and flattens out before it gels. That way you start with a smooth surface for the final sand and polish. I’ve found that Gloss needs a little higher air temp to go off properly: 80F usually works good. Resin is a little touchy at best. If you have the luxury of controlling the temperature and humidity of your working environment, try to work as close as possible to ideal, so your results will be predictable. Otherwise, experience will tell you how to fudge the system with catalyst, surfacing agent (SA), styrene, etc. Have fun and don’t be afraid to make mistakes. (I think I’ve make every one) Doug

Mitchell, Chemically,I’m not sure, but as far as performance: Hotcoat (or Sanding Resin) is a good all-around resin. You can mix in resin filler to make a paste for filling holes (doesn’t run out all over the place), and because it sets up clear you don’t have to worry about color. It sands great. Gloss resin is intended to set up slower so it settles down and flattens out before it gels. That way you start with a smooth surface for the final sand and polish. I’ve found that Gloss needs a little higher air temp to go off properly: 80F usually works good. Resin is a little touchy at best. If you have the luxury of controlling the temperature and humidity of your working environment, try to work as close as possible to ideal, so your results will be predictable. Otherwise, experience will tell you how to fudge the system with catalyst, surfacing agent (SA), styrene, etc. Have fun and don’t be afraid to make mistakes. (I think I’ve make every one) Doug

Gloss is also a lot more brittle. In the past I put it on all my boards, because I usually hit the weave a couple of times and didn’t care of the little extra weight. But it has led to many spider cracks in my short boards, I’m assuming because of how much flex and punishment a shortboard is subjected to (and also probably because I’m not a great glosser/glasser). I’m not using it on anything but a ‘candy shell’ on longboards anymore… its Future for me.

Gloss is also a lot more brittle. In the past I put it on all my boards, because I usually hit the weave a couple of times and didn’t care of the little extra weight. But it has led to many spider cracks in my short boards, I’m assuming because of how much flex and punishment a shortboard is subjected to (and also probably because I’m not a great glosser/glasser). I’m not using it on anything but a ‘candy shell’ on longboards anymore… its Future for me.