Introduction

Aloha kakou a pau,

Just short howzit as I was just srufing through info for my class and csame across your ongoing forum and decided to join in. Tom Stone; teach at Kapi’olani Community College; live above Kaimuki; into my cultural traditions - sports such as surfing, holua lelekawa, etc.; make the tradition woodboards, sleds, stone implements, etc.

I liked what I read and would like to expose my students to this forum because of its discussions that from a diverse group of people with various perspectives oln the subject of surfing and other things.

I teach the History of Hawai’i and the Pacific; History of Surfing - A Native Perspective; Tradition Sports of Old Hawai’i (these are for credit courses).

I don’t know if this iks an appropriate place to introduce myself but if it is I apologize. Look forward to taking part in various discussions when I have time.

Me ka ha’aha’a,

Tom Stone (Pohaku)

Hey Tom -

I hope I am OK to speak for the group and say that it is an honor to have you aboard.

Welcome!

Definitely.

THE Tom Stone? I hope. When Gerry ruled Pipe I thought you were just as good. Even better some days.

Mahalo 'oukou ma…I am off to class after some procrastinating on my part now rushing to get what I need to teach organized…look forward to da mana’o.

Tom

Aloha Tom - we’re honored to have you join us here at Swaylocks. In fact, your name was mentioned in a couple of different threads recently regarding the use of native woods (most specifically Koa) for surfboard construction and other uses. I’m looking forward to any input you might have on those posts and any others in the future…

aloha from the big island…

waxfoot

Tom, hope you will post your views on whatever interests you here. I saw you out at Leftovers last winter on one of Rex’s manta designs. Quite a futuristic design if I may say so. Aloha…

Quote:

Mahalo 'oukou ma…I am off to class after some procrastinating on my part now rushing to get what I need to teach organized…look forward to da mana’o

Welcome…

I / we look forward to any input you present here as it’ll be coming from “The Source”…

Please excuse my mainland ignorace, but how about some simple translation of the native dialect…

Paul

www.hollowsurfboards,com

Tom,

even for French surfers (I and a few others), that SURFER MAG cover with silver-gray Pipeline will remain in some little part of our minds, forever associated with “good times”. Bienvenue!

Nice to have you on Swaylocks.

I second Paul’s request for translations from the Hawaiian if it’s not too much trouble. Or maybe you can recommend a good on-line Hawaiian dictionary so we can educate ourselves…

E mahalo (thanks) for the plug…at the time I thought I was better, but realized that I never really knew how to surf and I still don’t…just have to keep at it and perhaps one day I will be as good. The whole thing regarding the exposure stuff was just pure chance (photos that launched my notorious surf life). Hope I can surf this site as well as most of you can - lots going on.

A hui hou (later)

Tom

Aloha kaua e Waxfoot,

I like da name has a good ring to it…to reach into to your reuqest regarding my input on da woodboards…there has been a lot written about the woodboards of old and what they were made of with the belief that most were of koa when in reality no…koa ecame very popular with the re-institution of the practice during the early 20th century because it was a wood that was being used to construct a lot of homes arcoss Hawaii. Koa planks were available to the populous of the time just like redwood that was imported so it became the preferred wood of choice. Not to mention the fact that it was durable and had some great natural qualities. This is not to say that koa was not used a lot in the oldtime prior to contact just the fact that there was other wood that was used one being the wiliwili. I use the wiliwili a lot today and it is amazing to ride a 14’ 120+ woodboard. I also use mango that is beautiful to work with, good weight, but is not the most bouyant - needs to be wide, whereas the wiliwili can be narrow (most were that way in the oldtime). Koa is just great all around but to find the slabs in the size that would be needed (10’x25"x3-4") is not easy. I have only to this point used one piece slabs no laminating sections together, though I am not against doing that if I have to. The problem with wiliwili is it is very fragile - dings easy, cracks, chips, etc., and I have broken 2 already in large surf. With wiliwili if are not constantly caring for it the wood will just breakdown in a short period of time. It needs ocean and oil treatment constantly. I have had 2 small ones glassed because I want to keep them. Wiliwili boards are rare even in the Bishop Museum, and I understand why after working with it. The trees (mahalo na akua, the gods) are there and I have found stands that are 15 - 30+ in height and have been able to get at least 2 boards out of one tree. I do not cut, or have not to this point cut living wiliwili trees, call it a native hang up but it was what I was taught. If I do there is/will be a lot of ritual that has to go into take the tree - for me. In the end all this making of the boards always requires some blood - no matter what I always end up giving my blood to the wood.

Just want to say that koa, mango, the hardwoods are just easy to work with but the wiliwili is soft and mistakes are easy so they take longer to make. And, I do use power tools. I have done the crafting traditionally but it takes a long time. Time, a luxury most of us do have in this modern world. I use kukui nut oil for the finish of my boards along with other native plants to help retard a significant amount of water but not all - it still soaks water which is good for perhaps 2-3 hours than it becomes really heavy.

Anyway, this is a small contribution to the discussion and question poised. I don’t claim to be da expert on this just what I know from my kupuna (elders). Get back to this later.

A hui hou,

Tom or Pohaku

Aloha Pohaku,

Thank you for joining up with Swaylocks. There are many here, both young and old, hungry for wisdom relating directly to the crafting of boards, but also topics that can only be communicated from the heart and soul - feelings based on years of experiencing. You will be able to offer knowledge from both levels.

As Waxfoot mentioned, there was a post last week titled “Respect for Hawaii - Crafting Wood Boards”, which you may want to read through. You’ll find it by going to the bottom of this page and clicking on to page 4 or 5. Many guys gave beautiful responses to the subject and I would be honored to hear your feelings if you get the opportunity to read it.

Mahalo and welcome again to Swaylocks.

RichardMc

Aloha e Paul,

Ok I will try to remember to follow up with english after da hawaiian…the (da) most common will be “a hui hou” (just means - later or see you later) because to say goodbye is final; e malama pono (take care); aloha kaua…(just means that we greet each other).

Since Paul requested the input I want to throw some things out about myself and I am sure it does not matter to everyone on this forum, but some history is good.

Yep, I am Tom Stone, otherwise referred to as Pohaku today which just for the most part is my last name in Hawaiian (there are other meanings to the name but it is not relevant here). The name was attached to me by my 'ohana (family) as my life was going through changes that re-directed me towards my native ways. I gave up surfing for approimately 10 years because I was having a difficult time dealing with my ego, drugs, and that moment of fame when I believed I was it, and I craved that attention and if I was not getting it then somebody had to pay for it - lashing out. It got to the point where my great girlfirend at the time from which my children would come from just could not put up with it and bailed. Things just got worse and I attempted to end my life twice. Eventually we got back together, but I had to give up surfing - I did it without a hesitation. Gave my boards away and just walked away. Got back into my culture and evetually windsurfing - a great replacement. After 10 years the boys cornered me one day a dragged me off to one of the islands offshore to surf. I sat in the boat for about an hour before I picked up a board and paddled into a wave. The rest is history. After 15 years as a lifeguard and a great marriage, due to injuries I retired from that and decided to complete my education which had a major impact on my relationship and my family. Stayed single for over 7 years focusing on my children, education, and my culture which is where I am today. I am remarried again to a great lady - why she wanted to hang with me is beyond me, but she is great, and my former wife and I/we are great friends.

As for the name Pohaku, that comes with the changing of the guard you might say. My father was referred to as Pohaku, but only with the passing of his father, so it appears to be the same for me. At first greetings in the 'ohana it is Pohaku, than they all return to calling me “Tommyboy”. In the Native community I am referred to as Pohaku and in the surfing world Tom Stone. It does not matter to me which reference is used. But it is an honor to be called Pohaku because it is a reflection of my connection to a history in the family.

I was teaching at UH - Manoa, but have since gone to KCC (Kapi’olani Community College) where I like it better - less politics. I teach "History of Hawai’i and Pacific, History of Surfing - A Native perspective (the name will be changed to Mythologies of Surfing, or something like that), and Traditional Sports of Old Hawai’i. I live on the mountain above Kaimuki / Wilhelmina Rise on Kawelolani. Have great view of the south shore, and I still head off to Pipe and the rest of the North shore every season. The crowd can be a factor on where I surf but I am usually there at sunrise, surf for 3 - 5 hours striaght then head off to campus for my afternoon/evening classes. I try to surf outer reefs on big days because it’s really quiet and peaceful. I still prefer to paddle in to big waves on these days when the condidtions are right, but I do have a PWC and love to tow but that is a last resort. I am not a shaper or a woodworker, just don’t have an answer as to how this wood work stuff comes to me except that it is my cultural way to just make what I need or want. I enjoy surfing the old way and the new - I ride Surftech epoxy boards and so far love them (short and long). They need some modification because the boards have more thickness then is necessary - the floatation is different from foam - plugs made need to account for that material difference.

Rex, a local shaper, made a unique board he named Manta, I call it the Alien. When I had it dialed in it was an amazing board to ride, but when I didn’t it was a bitch. To ride it I had to remember to drive it forward like a snowboard or skateboard…if you turned it like a regular surfboard you had problems…it is the future and has a place but I don’t think the public is ready, and it is going through progressive changes…the most important part is the bottom is very progressive and adds 30% more speed and turning ability then what we have today.

I happen on to this site because I was looking for info and links for my students - glad I found this place.

Ok, I think that should bring things up to date, and now I am ready to get into discussions.

A hui hou,

Tom

hey stone just paddled out…ambrose…go tommy

'O wau me ka ha’aha’a me kau 'olelo (I am humbled by your posting).

I will put together a couple of good links to Hawaiian dictionaries and post it.

I will get to posting links some time today.

Aloha no Pohaku…

I’m glad you’re here…

At least I know that you are one who lives by the hawaiian belief of live-by-doing not by talking… My old waterpolo buddies T.Ho and Edmund P. had only good things to say about you when you were in the red shorts ranks with them.

Maybe one day you can illuminate to the many here that live only by their keyboards, the nuances of riding 10 inches or so over skin tearing gravel slopes dressed only in a malo, traveling at speed on a tiny wooden sled…

I don’t think anyone here has any idea of the kind of things you’ve accomplished in your reasonably short life…

Sailboarding to Kauai might be another story to followup…

I am even more impressed with the things you’re doing today regarding both hawaiian and surf culture. You remind me of the things Mr. Bowman taught us when I was a young student in his woodshop class at the school on the hill. Funny at the time we thought of it as a prison…

Oh you’ll find alot of Surftech haters here… kind of funny since everyone here I know seems to like them…

Much respect for your Mana’o to come…

Quote:

Aloha kakou a pau,

Just short howzit as I was just srufing through info for my class and csame across your ongoing forum and decided to join in. Tom Stone; teach at Kapi’olani Community College; live above Kaimuki; into my cultural traditions - sports such as surfing, holua lelekawa, etc.; make the tradition woodboards, sleds, stone implements, etc.

I liked what I read and would like to expose my students to this forum because of its discussions that from a diverse group of people with various perspectives oln the subject of surfing and other things.

I teach the History of Hawai’i and the Pacific; History of Surfing - A Native Perspective; Tradition Sports of Old Hawai’i (these are for credit courses).

I don’t know if this iks an appropriate place to introduce myself but if it is I apologize. Look forward to taking part in various discussions when I have time.

Me ka ha’aha’a,

Tom Stone (Pohaku)

http://www.youtube.com/…&feature=related

Thanks for joining in. I teach a middle school art class and I do a Hawaii/Polynesia unit. I surveyed the history curriculum/texts here (LAUSD public school) and Polynesia was completely ignored (6-7 grade texts and curriculum) and the grade 8 US history book had one and a half pages on the “annexation” of Hawaii. Shameful.

I don’t know how good my little unit is. Onuela has helped me out with materials. I’m always looking for more. I may be pestering you with questions.

ps. Do you do summer school classes? Maybe I could get my professional development units and spend time in Hawaii tax deductable!

Oh, I just recently started a thread asking if there was any consensus about what is the oldest known images depicting surfing- both native and western. I suspect you’d know.