Longboard widepoint

I’m getting ready to build myself a new general purpose longboard, but I need some advice on where to put the wide point. I’m 6’5" 220 lb 54 yrs and plan on making a 10’ 6" x 24", 19" N, 15.25" T. I think I have a reasonable understanding of the general effects on performance of length, width, rocker, thickness, nose/tail width, hard/soft rails ect, but I don’t understand at all the effects/tradoffs of moving the widepoint forward/backward. A typical general purpose longboard appears to have the widepoint anywhere from at center to up to a foot ahead of center, is that about right? This appears to influence the overall template shape alot. Anyway, any explaination of the effects of widepoint position or advise on my particular board any of you experts could give me would be appreciated. P.S. I tried the archives and didn’t find anything. Thanks!

For a general purpose longboard wide point center will always work. As you move the wide point forward. you will start to lose volumn in the tail. This will affect turning, float, & the trim area (max trim moves forward) From your dimensions. it sound like you have a good basic template for a nose rider. Ray

If you offset a wide point forward it lengthens your turning radius. Makes the board more carvey and drivey, less skatey. On a shortboard, the difference is in how far back you lean to weight your turns, how far forward you lean to trim. On a longboard, the difference is in how far back you have to walk to turn, how far forward you have to walk to trim. You can make a longboard with a shorter turning radius by offsetting the wide point back. You have to stand on the tail to drop and turn, and it’s a long walk to the nose for trimming. If you offset the wide point forward, you lengthen the turning radius, but you can turn from the middle of the board, closer to where you trim. Offset also affects the lift and holding power you get while noseriding. A wider nose gives more lift when you hang out on it. A wider tail puts the fin farther from the rail. More likely to spin out when you’re on the nose. Counter to intuition, dropping in, forward offset makes you less likely to pearl. You drop in farther forward with your tail buried in the wave. Reverse offset performance longboards are made for doing the longboard dance. You give them lots of rocker progression and tail V. You get on the tail to drop in and bottom turn. You drive high, trim out, and stroll to the nose. They are specialized. You must practice to ride them properly. Forward offset boards work for almost anybody, even noseriding. Subtract the tail width from the nose width to derive a good forward offset. Because forward offset provides lift you don’t need quite as much nose width to throw around. I subtracted .5" from your nose width and worked up templates. This board is 10’6"long x 15.25"t x 24" x 18.5"n with a 4.5" stern. Wide point is offset 3.25" forward. Tail rocker is 3.02% (3.8") of board length, and nose rocker is 4.15", tending toward 27 degrees from center tangent. Foam is 3.2" thick. Lower rail foam is a .9" radius quarter cylinder, and the deck is moderately thinned to the rails. I would give it low hard tail rails with maybe 1/4" tail V. Length , Outline , Rocker 0 , 0.00 , 3.80 0 , 2.25 , 3.80 0.5 , 2.75 , 3.70 1 , 3.17 , 3.61 2 , 3.87 , 3.43 3 , 4.44 , 3.26 4 , 4.94 , 3.11 5 , 5.38 , 2.96 6 , 5.78 , 2.82 7 , 6.15 , 2.69 8 , 6.49 , 2.57 9 , 6.80 , 2.45 10 , 7.09 , 2.34 11 , 7.37 , 2.23 12 , 7.63 , 2.13 13 , 7.87 , 2.03 14 , 8.10 , 1.93 15 , 8.31 , 1.84 16 , 8.52 , 1.75 17 , 8.72 , 1.66 18 , 8.90 , 1.58 19 , 9.08 , 1.50 20 , 9.25 , 1.43 21 , 9.41 , 1.36 22 , 9.56 , 1.29 23 , 9.71 , 1.22 24 , 9.85 , 1.15 25 , 9.98 , 1.09 26 , 10.11 , 1.03 27 , 10.23 , 0.97 28 , 10.34 , 0.91 29 , 10.45 , 0.86 30 , 10.56 , 0.81 31 , 10.66 , 0.76 32 , 10.75 , 0.71 33 , 10.84 , 0.66 34 , 10.93 , 0.62 35 , 11.01 , 0.57 36 , 11.09 , 0.53 37 , 11.16 , 0.49 38 , 11.23 , 0.45 39 , 11.30 , 0.42 40 , 11.36 , 0.38 41 , 11.42 , 0.35 42 , 11.47 , 0.32 43 , 11.53 , 0.29 44 , 11.57 , 0.26 45 , 11.62 , 0.24 46 , 11.66 , 0.21 47 , 11.70 , 0.19 48 , 11.74 , 0.16 49 , 11.77 , 0.14 50 , 11.80 , 0.12 51 , 11.83 , 0.11 52 , 11.86 , 0.09 53 , 11.88 , 0.07 54 , 11.90 , 0.06 55 , 11.92 , 0.05 56 , 11.94 , 0.04 57 , 11.95 , 0.03 58 , 11.96 , 0.02 59 , 11.97 , 0.01 60 , 11.98 , 0.01 61 , 11.99 , 0.00 62 , 11.99 , 0.00 63 , 12.00 , 0.00 64 , 12.00 , 0.00 65 , 12.00 , 0.00 66 , 12.00 , 0.00 67 , 12.00 , 0.01 68 , 12.00 , 0.01 69 , 12.00 , 0.02 70 , 12.00 , 0.03 71 , 12.00 , 0.04 72 , 12.00 , 0.05 73 , 12.00 , 0.06 74 , 12.00 , 0.08 75 , 12.00 , 0.09 76 , 12.00 , 0.11 77 , 12.00 , 0.13 78 , 11.99 , 0.15 79 , 11.99 , 0.17 80 , 11.99 , 0.19 81 , 11.98 , 0.22 82 , 11.98 , 0.24 83 , 11.97 , 0.27 84 , 11.97 , 0.30 85 , 11.96 , 0.33 86 , 11.95 , 0.36 87 , 11.93 , 0.40 88 , 11.92 , 0.43 89 , 11.90 , 0.47 90 , 11.88 , 0.51 91 , 11.85 , 0.55 92 , 11.83 , 0.59 93 , 11.80 , 0.64 94 , 11.76 , 0.69 95 , 11.72 , 0.74 96 , 11.68 , 0.79 97 , 11.63 , 0.84 98 , 11.57 , 0.90 99 , 11.51 , 0.95 100 , 11.44 , 1.01 101 , 11.36 , 1.08 102 , 11.27 , 1.14 103 , 11.18 , 1.21 104 , 11.07 , 1.28 105 , 10.96 , 1.35 106 , 10.83 , 1.43 107 , 10.69 , 1.51 108 , 10.54 , 1.59 109 , 10.37 , 1.68 110 , 10.19 , 1.77 111 , 9.98 , 1.86 112 , 9.76 , 1.96 113 , 9.52 , 2.06 114 , 9.25 , 2.17 115 , 8.95 , 2.28 116 , 8.63 , 2.40 117 , 8.27 , 2.53 118 , 7.86 , 2.66 119 , 7.41 , 2.80 120 , 6.91 , 2.95 121 , 6.33 , 3.11 122 , 5.66 , 3.28 123 , 4.87 , 3.46 124 , 3.89 , 3.67 125 , 2.58 , 3.89 126 , 0.00 , 4.15 RAIL: Width , Deck , Bottom 0 , 2.30 , -0.90 1 , 2.30 , -0.90 2 , 2.30 , -0.90 3 , 2.30 , -0.90 4 , 2.29 , -0.90 5 , 2.28 , -0.90 6 , 2.24 , -0.90 7 , 2.19 , -0.90 7.5 , 2.15 , -0.90 8.0 , 2.10 , -0.90 8.5 , 2.03 , -0.90 9.5 , 1.84 , -0.90 10.0 , 1.71 , -0.90 10.9 , 1.35 , -0.90 11 , 1.30 , -0.90 11.1 , 1.24 , -0.90 11.2 , 1.18 , -0.89 11.3 , 1.11 , -0.88 11.4 , 1.03 , -0.85 11.5 , 0.95 , -0.81 11.6 , 0.86 , -0.75 11.7 , 0.75 , -0.67 11.85 , 0.53 , -0.50 11.95 , 0.31 , -0.30 12.00 , 0.00 , -0.00 INSTRUCTIONS: The measurements are in inches. Since inch measurements shorter than one foot break down in decimals, buy an engineer’s scale. For the outline, get a roll of wide paper. I use brown postage wrap. Tape the paper to a flat surface. Draw a straight line longer than the board, roughly centered down the length of the paper. This will be the center stringer line. Make a mark on one end. That mark will be zero, the board stern. Use a tape measure to measure up the line and make hash marks. Place marks at every “y” measurement within a foot or so of the board ends where the outline will curve a lot. You can mark every three or four inches at mid-board. Use a straight edge and a square to extend the hash marks to the rail lines. With your scale, measure from the stringer line, out each hash line, and place a mark where the rail will intersect it. By now you should be asking “Why didn’t I use crosshatch paper?” If you wanna blow the bucks, back up and use it. Draw a line around the rail outline. See how the outline looks. Adjust it as you like, then cut only the outline of one side of the board. Tape your template to the blank. Draw one rail, flip it and draw the other rail. Lets back up again. You just made an outline which measures the desired horizontal, but you’re going to lay it, curved over the bottom of the board. The template will be shorter than your desired board. I usually place the desired straight-measured end marks on the blank, then draw the nose and tail outlines from the ends to mid-board, shifting the template between draws. I’ve also placed the paper outline slightly short of where I wanted a longboard nose, then sharpened the nose from about 2 inches back. Use another long piece of paper the same way for a rocker template. Instead of cutting the template out of the paper, Get some spray on craft glue. Stick the paper to some 1/8" plywood, and cut an outside template along the board side of the line. Rail: Draw a +/- 13 inch “width” line. The line represents a line running across, through the wide point of the board at the height of the rail line, where the rail turns vertical. Mark zero on one end. Zero width is at the center of the stringer. Measure from the stringer, and mark widths on the line. At each width mark measure and mark corresponding heights up to the deck, and down to the bottom. You need an engineers scale to use the above method. But now that you have the concept, you can buy some 8.5" x 14" graph paper, divided in .1" or .2" lines, from an office supply store and do it alot easier.

Thanks, thats exactly the information I was looking for.