Suncure

I need to repair a ding overnight. Is there any way to harden this stuff w/out placing it in the sun? i.e. a hair dryer?

Maybe i’m refrring to something different, maybe I’m not. I’m talking about those little tubes of ding repair stuff you buy, you slap it on, put it in the sun and you’re done. Not sure where the caltalyst comes in. thanks

there is no catalyst in the kit, but you could buy some at the lumber yard. Rather than using sunshine try some other UV light source. Regular flourescents a close range will make it go off eventually (hours), a tanning lamp, a black light flourescent tube works also. It is triggered by UVA-UVB light, not heat. Tom S.>>> Maybe i’m refrring to something different, maybe I’m not. I’m talking > about those little tubes of ding repair stuff you buy, you slap it on, put > it in the sun and you’re done. Not sure where the caltalyst comes in. > thanks

Tom is right on. Sorry for any confusion. Heat will do nothing to help your resin kick. If you don’t have UV from the Sun then you have to substitute it with something else. I was just saying to get some catalyst (MEKP) and add it to your mix. The catalyst will cause the reaction to happen. If you have never used catalyst you might want to do a test. If you use to much catalyst the resin will yellow or even catch fire. With the UV resin they say as long as you can go outside and see any kind of shadow then the resin will kick. It just might take longer. In full sunlight it will fully kick in a mattter of minutes.

At the old Monterey Bay Fiberglass they had resin samples showing clarity of different types. One sample was obviously darker than the rest and had a label saying that it had been “over catalyzed.” If you add conventional catalyst to UV resin, will it cause yellowing or darkening after UV exposure?

John: I’m not sure about the premixed tubes of SunCure or SolarRez, because I’ve heard that there are milled fibers and other things in these kit forms. I use SunCure powder added to my own Silmar S249a. I lam with it as a UV cure resin. I use the same mix for hotcoats and glossing (after I thin it with Styrene). So far there have been no ill effects of using MEK in addition to the UV additive. In fact, true to the claims, I find “the whites are whiter”, a couple of my favorites have seen a year or more of heavy exposure to the sun and are still nice and bright. Tom S.>>> At the old Monterey Bay Fiberglass they had resin samples showing clarity > of different types. One sample was obviously darker than the rest and had > a label saying that it had been “over catalyzed.” If you add > conventional catalyst to UV resin, will it cause yellowing or darkening > after UV exposure?

The only time I have intentionally added catalyst to UV resin and then exposed to UV rays was in doing glassing with opaque laminates. The older formula sometimes would not work well under objects that would block UV rays (ie. a dark lam). The resin exposed would kick fine but the area under the lams would not kick as fast or at all and you would end up with a bubble in your glass work. So to combat this I would add a very small amount of catalyst to a small batch of UV resin, set my lams, then roll my glass back over and laminate as usual with UV resin. Then expose the whole thing to UV. The newer, I would say in the past couple of years, has gotten much better. This is hardly a problem (but I still do it to be cautious). The only reason to add catalyst to UV in my opinion is the reason above, if you have to do something at night and have no UV alternative, or if you are using UV resin to set a fin box, or any other areas where you are talking about depth. This is just regualr poly resin with an additive (a yellowish powder, from my experience), whereby UV takes the place of catalyst. In mixing the two (UV rays and MEKP) one should augment the other. A simplified example, if you have UV resin mixed up and you also mix in your normal amount of MEKP and then you expose it to UV Rays, you are in essence double the catalyizing agents. Bottom line in my opinion don’t mix them unless you have to.